Daily Bulletin

Health

  • Written by NewsServices.com

With influencers like Joe Rogan lending their support to off-label treatments and preventative measures, it may be tempting to follow his advice and buy medical supplies online instead of lining up for the COVID-19 vaccine. However, before you start hunting for Azithromycin and Ivermectin, it’s important to have a clear understanding of whether any of the fears surrounding the vaccines are valid. With this in mind, let’s take a look at six rumors that have been circulating on social media.  

Myth 1. The COVID-19 vaccine alters your DNA

This myth likely arose from the fact that vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna use mRNA to help your body develop immunity to the virus. Think of mRNA as a little messenger that takes instructions from your DNA to your cells. This is how your genetic code dictates the activities that go on in your body on a cellular level.

The mRNA vaccines have been designed to take a very specific message to your cells, instructing them to make a protein present in COVID-19. This triggers an immune response, teaching your body how to handle the virus in the future. 

Once this message has been delivered, the mRNA is broken down by your body, and your DNA never comes into the equation.

Myth 2. The vaccines contain microchips 

What a thrill it would be to have an evil microchip-wielding overlord to rise up against. Sadly, our world is far more mundane. There are no microchips in the COVID-19 vaccines, nor would an evil genius need to bother with such technology if they wanted to track your every move.

You already carry a tracking device around with you wherever you go. If you’re worried about being tracked and spied on, it may be worth focusing your attention on your smartphone first. 

Myth 3. The vaccine can give you COVID-19

Currently, there are no authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the US that contain the live virus. Though you may feel unwell from the immune response described in the explanation of Myth 1, this doesn’t mean you have COVID-19. These symptoms are simply an indication that your body has recognized a foreign entity (the aforementioned protein) and protected itself against it. 

Myth 4. Vaccinated people shed virus particles

Spend any amount of time on social media, and you’ll see how prevalent this myth is. However, as explained in Myth 3, none of the approved vaccines in the US contain a weakened version of COVID-19. Currently, mRNA and viral vector vaccines are the only authorized options, and shedding isn’t an issue because there is no virus to shed.

Myth 5. mRNA vaccines are completely untested

Many of us only heard about mRNA vaccines because of the COVID-19 crisis. However, like most medical breakthroughs, research and development have been quietly underway for many years. While it is true that these vaccines were fast-tracked due to the urgency created by the pandemic, that does not mean that they haven’t gone through rigorous testing. 

Myth 6. The vaccine can make you magnetic

We saved the wildest one for last. If this rumor has you worried, you can put your mind at ease. There are no metals in the COVID-19 vaccines, and none of the ingredients are capable of producing an electromagnetic field. If this was a side-effect, you can guarantee there’d be videos all over the internet by now. 


Though COVID-19 is a medical crisis, it has been politicized, meaning it is difficult for people to know which information sources they can trust. To find your way to the truth, focus your attention on credible medical sources.

With influencers like Joe Rogan lending their support to off-label treatments and preventative measures, it may be tempting to follow his advice and buy medical supplies online instead of lining up for the COVID-19 vaccine. However, before you start hunting for Azithromycin and Ivermectin, it’s important to have a clear understanding of whether any of the fears surrounding the vaccines are valid. With this in mind, let’s take a look at six rumors that have been circulating on social media.  

Myth 1. The COVID-19 vaccine alters your DNA

This myth likely arose from the fact that vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna use mRNA to help your body develop immunity to the virus. Think of mRNA as a little messenger that takes instructions from your DNA to your cells. This is how your genetic code dictates the activities that go on in your body on a cellular level.

The mRNA vaccines have been designed to take a very specific message to your cells, instructing them to make a protein present in COVID-19. This triggers an immune response, teaching your body how to handle the virus in the future. 

Once this message has been delivered, the mRNA is broken down by your body, and your DNA never comes into the equation.

Myth 2. The vaccines contain microchips 

What a thrill it would be to have an evil microchip-wielding overlord to rise up against. Sadly, our world is far more mundane. There are no microchips in the COVID-19 vaccines, nor would an evil genius need to bother with such technology if they wanted to track your every move.

You already carry a tracking device around with you wherever you go. If you’re worried about being tracked and spied on, it may be worth focusing your attention on your smartphone first. 

Myth 3. The vaccine can give you COVID-19

Currently, there are no authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the US that contain the live virus. Though you may feel unwell from the immune response described in the explanation of Myth 1, this doesn’t mean you have COVID-19. These symptoms are simply an indication that your body has recognized a foreign entity (the aforementioned protein) and protected itself against it. 

Myth 4. Vaccinated people shed virus particles

Spend any amount of time on social media, and you’ll see how prevalent this myth is. However, as explained in Myth 3, none of the approved vaccines in the US contain a weakened version of COVID-19. Currently, mRNA and viral vector vaccines are the only authorized options, and shedding isn’t an issue because there is no virus to shed.

Myth 5. mRNA vaccines are completely untested

Many of us only heard about mRNA vaccines because of the COVID-19 crisis. However, like most medical breakthroughs, research and development have been quietly underway for many years. While it is true that these vaccines were fast-tracked due to the urgency created by the pandemic, that does not mean that they haven’t gone through rigorous testing. 

Myth 6. The vaccine can make you magnetic

We saved the wildest one for last. If this rumor has you worried, you can put your mind at ease. There are no metals in the COVID-19 vaccines, and none of the ingredients are capable of producing an electromagnetic field. If this was a side-effect, you can guarantee there’d be videos all over the internet by now. 


Though COVID-19 is a medical crisis, it has been politicized, meaning it is difficult for people to know which information sources they can trust. To find your way to the truth, focus your attention on credible medical sources.

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