Daily Bulletin

Health

  • Written by NewsServices.com


You’re probably reading this article seeing that you just got home from your doctor’s appointment and they recommended that undergoing bariatric surgery would be best in getting in shape and losing weight. You’re probably wondering what goes on with the procedure.

Let’s first put light on how this procedure works; it’s basically a weight loss surgery also known as metabolic surgery. It’s usually done to people that are obese and have long-term illnesses. There are various types of bariatric surgery, including Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), Adjustable Gastric Band (AGB), Sleeve Gastrectomy, and more.

In this article, we’ll only be focusing on the information surrounding Sleeve Gasectromy. Specifically about how it’s done or its procedure, its advantages and disadvantages, and who should undergo it.

  1. How is sleeve gastrectomy carried out?


What goes on during the surgery

Usually, incisions in the belly are performed in Gastric Sleeve, Sleeve Gastrectomy procedures. It is customarily executed laparoscopically, which entails introducing small instruments within many small incisions in the upper belly. Before your operation, you will be given a general anesthetic.

The surgeon constructs a thin sleeve by stapling the stomach vertically and removing the wider, curved portion of the stomach. This surgical procedure generally lasts for about one to two hours.

What goes on after the surgery

The recuperation or rehabilitation time is usually rather brief. Patients are expected to be up and about right away. Most of the patients are able to walk the day following surgery. Some pain around the incisions at first is to be anticipated, however, it can be managed with pain medication and usually goes away after a few days.

The amount of physical activity required determines how quickly patients may return to work. One thing that patients should stay clear from is heavy lifting. Heavy lifting and other strenuous activities should be avoided for a month or even more after surgery. Those who work at a desk generally return to work after two weeks.

The patient’s diet should also be evaluated. Avoid consuming food that is high in sugar, especially carbonated drinks in a span of 7 days after the surgery. Pureed food is recommended within the three weeks of initial recovery. Patients can then gradually eat regular food for about four weeks after their operation.

Post-operative Care

For better results, it’s best to visit your surgeon for post-operative check ups. These check ups tell the doctor on how you’re recovering from the surgery. Any illness or discomfort that develops after the operation should always be reported during consultation. Here are some signs that you need to immediately report to your healthcare provider:

  • * Fever and Chills

  • * Presence of Pus or Drainage

  • * Redness

  • * Pain around incision area

  • * Smell from incision area

Even if you don’t have the signs mentioned above, post-operative consultations are still a must. Not only will your doctor look at your incision, he/she can also prescribe additional medication, multivitamins, supplements, and even suggest meal plans to hasten your recovery.

  1. What are the pros of getting a sleeve gastrectomy?

Weight Loss

Patients will be losing a percentage of their excess weight throughout treatment. Many studies have also demonstrated that sleeve gastrectomy is highly successful in treating and even causing the regression of diabetes, high blood pressure, and other morbid obesity-related medical problems.

Mental Wellness

Patients also started feeling confident and energetic, as well as being able to participate in more events. Several pieces of research have found that sleeve gastrectomy help decreases mental issues in morbidly obese patients.

However, determining the preoperative prevalence of depression and its relationship with postsurgical losing weight in gastric bypass candidates is yet to be explored. Because of the strong link between depression and obesity, it is one of the most prevalent illnesses among people who are candidates for bariatric surgery.


  1. What are the cons of getting a sleeve gastrectomy?

Post-operative Complications

The most frequent postoperative problems after a sleeve gastrectomy include bleeding, leakage, and gastric fistulae. The technique for identifying intra-operative staple line bleeds are not standardized, they are routinely treated with diathermy, wound care, sealants, and clips, or they may self-resolve by applying pressure along the wound line.

Nutritional Deficiency

Vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and vitamin D insufficiency are the most frequent micronutrient deficiencies. Thiamine, folate, and fat-soluble vitamins are examples of other micronutrient deficits that can drive to serious consequences.

According to research, sleeve gastrectomy fundamentally improved health three years following surgery, but by year five, nutritional levels had reverted to baseline levels. These findings highlight the importance of clinical surveillance within the first five years.

  1. Who should be getting a sleeve gastrectomy?

The gastric sleeve is not suitable for everyone who is obese. Before a patient is cleared for surgery, he or she must meet certain requirements. In general, gastric sleeve surgery is recommended for morbidly obese adults, defined as persons aged 18 to 65 with a BMI of 40 or above.

  1. Preoperative Screening

Some people have health issues that make major surgery extremely dangerous. To ensure your safety, a team of nurses and other healthcare providers will assist you with screening procedures before the operation.

The screening procedure is ordered by your surgeon and is part of the whole preoperative care plan. Except for emergency situations, no operations can be performed without proper screening.

Remember, your healthcare providers will always provide you with information regarding your procedure. If you’re anxious or having fears before your procedure, it’s totally normal. Your surgeon and nurses will take care of you throughout the whole process: from preoperative, perioperative, intraoperative, postoperative, and post-discharge phases.

Takeaway

Having surgery is always a big, and often scary procedure for many people. Sleeve gastrectomy for example, is an invasive procedure. It’s normal if you’re feeling anxious before your operation. With the info above and your healthcare team, you’ll be ready for your operation.



You’re probably reading this article seeing that you just got home from your doctor’s appointment and they recommended that undergoing bariatric surgery would be best in getting in shape and losing weight. You’re probably wondering what goes on with the procedure.

Let’s first put light on how this procedure works; it’s basically a weight loss surgery also known as metabolic surgery. It’s usually done to people that are obese and have long-term illnesses. There are various types of bariatric surgery, including Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), Adjustable Gastric Band (AGB), Sleeve Gastrectomy, and more.

In this article, we’ll only be focusing on the information surrounding Sleeve Gasectromy. Specifically about how it’s done or its procedure, its advantages and disadvantages, and who should undergo it.

  1. How is sleeve gastrectomy carried out?


What goes on during the surgery

Usually, incisions in the belly are performed in Gastric Sleeve, Sleeve Gastrectomy procedures. It is customarily executed laparoscopically, which entails introducing small instruments within many small incisions in the upper belly. Before your operation, you will be given a general anesthetic.

The surgeon constructs a thin sleeve by stapling the stomach vertically and removing the wider, curved portion of the stomach. This surgical procedure generally lasts for about one to two hours.

What goes on after the surgery

The recuperation or rehabilitation time is usually rather brief. Patients are expected to be up and about right away. Most of the patients are able to walk the day following surgery. Some pain around the incisions at first is to be anticipated, however, it can be managed with pain medication and usually goes away after a few days.

The amount of physical activity required determines how quickly patients may return to work. One thing that patients should stay clear from is heavy lifting. Heavy lifting and other strenuous activities should be avoided for a month or even more after surgery. Those who work at a desk generally return to work after two weeks.

The patient’s diet should also be evaluated. Avoid consuming food that is high in sugar, especially carbonated drinks in a span of 7 days after the surgery. Pureed food is recommended within the three weeks of initial recovery. Patients can then gradually eat regular food for about four weeks after their operation.

Post-operative Care

For better results, it’s best to visit your surgeon for post-operative check ups. These check ups tell the doctor on how you’re recovering from the surgery. Any illness or discomfort that develops after the operation should always be reported during consultation. Here are some signs that you need to immediately report to your healthcare provider:

  • * Fever and Chills

  • * Presence of Pus or Drainage

  • * Redness

  • * Pain around incision area

  • * Smell from incision area

Even if you don’t have the signs mentioned above, post-operative consultations are still a must. Not only will your doctor look at your incision, he/she can also prescribe additional medication, multivitamins, supplements, and even suggest meal plans to hasten your recovery.

  1. What are the pros of getting a sleeve gastrectomy?

Weight Loss

Patients will be losing a percentage of their excess weight throughout treatment. Many studies have also demonstrated that sleeve gastrectomy is highly successful in treating and even causing the regression of diabetes, high blood pressure, and other morbid obesity-related medical problems.

Mental Wellness

Patients also started feeling confident and energetic, as well as being able to participate in more events. Several pieces of research have found that sleeve gastrectomy help decreases mental issues in morbidly obese patients.

However, determining the preoperative prevalence of depression and its relationship with postsurgical losing weight in gastric bypass candidates is yet to be explored. Because of the strong link between depression and obesity, it is one of the most prevalent illnesses among people who are candidates for bariatric surgery.


  1. What are the cons of getting a sleeve gastrectomy?

Post-operative Complications

The most frequent postoperative problems after a sleeve gastrectomy include bleeding, leakage, and gastric fistulae. The technique for identifying intra-operative staple line bleeds are not standardized, they are routinely treated with diathermy, wound care, sealants, and clips, or they may self-resolve by applying pressure along the wound line.

Nutritional Deficiency

Vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and vitamin D insufficiency are the most frequent micronutrient deficiencies. Thiamine, folate, and fat-soluble vitamins are examples of other micronutrient deficits that can drive to serious consequences.

According to research, sleeve gastrectomy fundamentally improved health three years following surgery, but by year five, nutritional levels had reverted to baseline levels. These findings highlight the importance of clinical surveillance within the first five years.

  1. Who should be getting a sleeve gastrectomy?

The gastric sleeve is not suitable for everyone who is obese. Before a patient is cleared for surgery, he or she must meet certain requirements. In general, gastric sleeve surgery is recommended for morbidly obese adults, defined as persons aged 18 to 65 with a BMI of 40 or above.

  1. Preoperative Screening

Some people have health issues that make major surgery extremely dangerous. To ensure your safety, a team of nurses and other healthcare providers will assist you with screening procedures before the operation.

The screening procedure is ordered by your surgeon and is part of the whole preoperative care plan. Except for emergency situations, no operations can be performed without proper screening.

Remember, your healthcare providers will always provide you with information regarding your procedure. If you’re anxious or having fears before your procedure, it’s totally normal. Your surgeon and nurses will take care of you throughout the whole process: from preoperative, perioperative, intraoperative, postoperative, and post-discharge phases.

Takeaway

Having surgery is always a big, and often scary procedure for many people. Sleeve gastrectomy for example, is an invasive procedure. It’s normal if you’re feeling anxious before your operation. With the info above and your healthcare team, you’ll be ready for your operation.

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