..


Technology

  • Written by News Company


The uptake of solar power across Australia is accelerating as the price of panels decrease and installations become increasingly common. Homeowners not only enjoy the cost-savings that solar power can provide but also relish in the fact that they are reducing their carbon footprint in the process. Utilising the power of the Sun to power our homes and businesses is the way of the future, not just for our pockets but for the health of our planet.

Non-renewable energy sources are becoming more and more depleted every year, putting even more importance on the importance of renewable energy sources. Deriving energy from the sun, solar power helps us to combat greenhouse gas emissions and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Through the use of solar, we can lessen the negative impact we are having on our earth and repair some of the damage that has been done.

To learn more about the positive environmental effect switching to solar can have, continue reading below.

Reduce Carbon Emissions

Unfortunately, Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions are on the increase, rising 1% last year. In order to combat this, it’s important for homeowners and business owners alike to consider using installing and utilising solar energy as a viable energy source.

A typical two-person household can reduce their carbon emissions by between three and four tonnes annually by switching to solar power in Sydney. As more and more people make the move to solar power, the demand for fossil fuels will naturally decrease and reduce carbon emissions across Australia significantly. With everyone contributing to the problem, we can ensure that we turn the needle on Australia’s greenhouse gas emission levels.

Greater Public Health

Fewer carbon emissions and burning less fossil fuels leads to a greater overall improvement in public health. In areas where there a large amount of solar and renewable energy sources are being utilised, cases of chronic bronchitis, respiratory and cardiovascular problems were substantially reduced.

Living in a healthier, cleaner environment means improved life expectancy and reduced mortality rates. It also leads to fewer sick days from work and school and eases the pressure on the country’s medical system as the population is generally healthier.

Decrease Water Usage

Australia is susceptible to harsh weather conditions, often resulting in limited water supplies and restrictions on water usage. Coal and nuclear energy plants can use anywhere from twenty to sixty gallons of water for the production of each kilowatt-hour of electricity, creating a huge draw on water supplies.

Solar power, on the other hand, uses little, or no, water at all to produce energy. In fact, when you include everything from the manufacturing to the installation to implementation, to eventually, removal, solar energy uses a whopping 86% - 89% less water than coal produced electricity. By making the move to solar, we can have access to more clean water for both residential and commercial use in Australia.

Durable and Long Lasting

When compared with other energy-producing mechanisms, solar panels have a significantly longer lifespan, with many having a warranted lifespan of twenty-five years.  This, of course, leads to reduced levels of waste needing to be recycled or ending up in landfill, having a further positive effect on our environment.

When you purchase your solar panels, you’ll know they can stand the test of time and will not need to be replaced for decades to come.

Switching to Solar and Have a Positive Impact on Australia

Solar power is the way of the future and will lead to decreased monthly bills for your home or business as well as benefit the world around you. By simply installing solar panels in your home, you can help to reduce carbon emissions across Australia, decrease the amount of water that is used and contribute to improved public health.

With so much to be gained from the implementation of solar power both as individuals and as a nation, we will have a brighter Australia for many generations to come.

You might also like